Coat Cooke

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"High Wire" Review

Hey y'all. Here's another appreciative review.

http://www.thesoundprojector.com/2013/07/01/locking-horns/

Which brings me to the High Wire (NOW ORCHESTRA RECORDS CLNOW007) CD by Coat Cooke & Rainer Wiens. It’s funny how certain sleeve artistry can swivel its hips and sell you the perfect dummy as regards its contents. A scratchy line drawing of the duo (20c euro-surrealist stick figures v Jad Fair-style handiwork), seems to suggest two men, eyeballs on stalks, on a Ted Milton meets Chadbourne’s ‘Rake’ trip, but these Canadian free jazzers generate a more subtle range of moods a couple of notches below ‘raging’ – if you will. Coat’s sax lines can be skidaddingly busy (“Storm Eye”) and, on occasion, suspenseful/measured (“Space Landing”) while Rainer appears to be a guitar manipulator of an extreme stripe. All those familiar attributes of the gitbox are utterly blown to smithereens and possibly beyond. The fiend. A fiend whose vocab of wide-ranging metallic sonorities has certain echoes in the work of fellow countryman Tim Olive, perhaps. So strap yourselves in for a soundworld where hailstones (as big as ball bearings) splatter against rusted metal railings and then combine with clanking percussive broadsides and the moan of a defective slinky made entirely of rusted cutlery. Or not?…a couple of pics of this noisesome beast would’ve been really useful. For me, the high point of all this plucked and blown activity has to be the ten minutes plus of “Elevation” in which the guitar thing from Planet X is stood down in favour of the gentler sproing of the thumb piano. The lyrical sax moves had me scribbling in a previous draft “John Surman on a fact finding mission within deepest Africa” and I see no reason to amend that really… It’s a stellar track and a fascinating collection to boot. The CD’s title suggests a fine line between assured movement and collapse. This is assured movement as sure as eggs. This comes from the Now Orchestra imprint, which is also responsible for the formation of a sixteen man improv ork in which Barry Guy, George Lewis and Marilyn Crispell have taken guest spots over the past few years.

Another "High Wire" Review

Here's another new review from the website "The Sound Projector"

http://www.thesoundprojector.com/2013/07/01/locking-horns/

Which brings me to the High Wire (NOW ORCHESTRA RECORDS CLNOW007) CD by Coat Cooke & Rainer Wiens. It’s funny how certain sleeve artistry can swivel its hips and sell you the perfect dummy as regards its contents. A scratchy line drawing of the duo (20c euro-surrealist stick figures v Jad Fair-style handiwork), seems to suggest two men, eyeballs on stalks, on a Ted Milton meets Chadbourne’s ‘Rake’ trip, but these Canadian free jazzers generate a more subtle range of moods a couple of notches below ‘raging’ – if you will. Coat’s sax lines can be skidaddingly busy (“Storm Eye”) and, on occasion, suspenseful/measured (“Space Landing”) while Rainer appears to be a guitar manipulator of an extreme stripe. All those familiar attributes of the gitbox are utterly blown to smithereens and possibly beyond. The fiend. A fiend whose vocab of wide-ranging metallic sonorities has certain echoes in the work of fellow countryman Tim Olive, perhaps. So strap yourselves in for a soundworld where hailstones (as big as ball bearings) splatter against rusted metal railings and then combine with clanking percussive broadsides and the moan of a defective slinky made entirely of rusted cutlery. Or not?…a couple of pics of this noisesome beast would’ve been really useful. For me, the high point of all this plucked and blown activity has to be the ten minutes plus of “Elevation” in which the guitar thing from Planet X is stood down in favour of the gentler sproing of the thumb piano. The lyrical sax moves had me scribbling in a previous draft “John Surman on a fact finding mission within deepest Africa” and I see no reason to amend that really… It’s a stellar track and a fascinating collection to boot. The CD’s title suggests a fine line between assured movement and collapse. This is assured movement as sure as eggs. This comes from the Now Orchestra imprint, which is also responsible for the formation of a sixteen man improv ork in which Barry Guy, George Lewis and Marilyn Crispell have taken guest spots over the past few years.

New Review of Conversations

Exclaim review of Conversations

By Nilan Perera

8

Sometimes you can have a conversation, leave it and realise there was really nothing said. Pleasantries, clichés and superficialities all contribute to interactions that say more about passing the time than conveying anything of note. The same can be said of some musical dialogues, but not so of this particular series of exchanges by Vancouverite stalwarts Coat Cooke (reeds) and Joe Poole (drum kit). The subjects of conversation range from thoughtful, spacious musings that leave room for consideration and counter-arguments to spirited, yet friendly, sparring, but all are highly articulate, not given to extraneous chatter. These are experienced seasoned players who understand the freedom and responsibilities of improvisation that come so distinctly from jazz melodicism and rhythmic flexibility, yet range further afield.
(NowOrchestra)

http://exclaim.ca/Reviews/ImprovAndAvantGarde/coat_cooke_joe_poole-conversations

 

Coat Cooke Quartet @ Vancouver Jazz Fest/July 1

I'm extremely excited to be playing with my new band, the Coat Cooke Quartet tomorrow (July 1st, 2013).

We'll be performing at Perfromance Works on Vancouver's Granville Island during the Canada Day celebrations there.

We play one set for about 70 minutes.

The incredibly talented band features Chad MacCQuarrie on guitar, Karlis Silins on electric and acoustic bass and

Joe Poole playing drums. We'll be playing new pieces of mine like; My Penelope, Yo Yo Yo; old chestnuts like Ranül

and Rhumbatto and a few tunes that I've always wanted to do like David "Fathead" Newman's The Clincher,

 a quirky arrangement of Thelonius Monk's Epistrophy and a loving tribute to George Harrison playing his song

Within You Without You.

I really hope you can make it out to hear us. The cost is right ... it's free. You just have to be willing to brave the crowds

and the heat.

This Friday show w. Michael Duch/Tor Haugerud/Coat Cooke

Come and hear an evening of improvised music with Norwegian greats Michael Francis Duch/bass and Tor Haugerud/drums with Coat Cooke/saxophone. Sure to be a great show.
Music at 10 pm. Cover $5 - 10 sliding scale.
1115B Hastings at Glen Drive - entrance on Glen Drive.
http://md.thiswaydesign.com/projects/en-en-en/
http://www.coatcooke.com/

Coat Cooke Quartet Show

Last night's two sets at X-Site (El Barrio) were very exciting for me. Chad MacQuarrie, Karlis Silins and Joe Poole are among the most inspiring musicians that I've had the opportunity to play with. This was our first gig, and even though I've played with them all, it didn't become apparent what kind of synergy was awaiting until we played last night. There is a willingness and openness  with this quartet to flow and morph ideas creating really unique landscapes. I'm looking forwad to our next gig at the Vancouver Jazz Festival on July 1st at 2 pm at Performance works on Granville Island. I hope that you're able to come out and hear the band.

Coat Cooke Quartet Debut

I'm very excited about the debut gig of my new quartet on May 23, 2013 at X-site (the old El Barrio at 2270 East Hastings St.).

This band features the creative and driving guitarist Chad MacQuarrie. I've played with Chad for a number of years now in various

projects like my large ensemble, Orkestra Futura and my electric quintet Meta 5 - as well as his band Assertion. He brings great

integrity to everything he does and Chad never ever phones it in. He is truly a pleasure to play with.

Karlis Silins is newer to my musical world. We've played standards, improvised and recently played in the Orkestra Futura + Vancouver Electronic Ensemble.

I love how fluent Karlis is on acoustic and electric bass. He has a great sound, can play lyrically or hard driving and is a great listening improvisor. I'm really

excited to have him as the bass player in this new ensemble.

Joe Poole is probably the greatest drummer I've had the chance to work with. He is utterly committed to to the music and has a vocabulary encompassing

South Indian music, rock and funk, all eras of jazz language, as well as a beautiful sense of form and development as an improvisor. Anoher really exciting aspect

to his playing is his almost infinite sense of timbral nuance. Joe and I released a duo CD in 2012 called Conversations available for download at

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/coatcooke2

We'll be playing some new pieces of mine like Yo Yo Yo (a.k.a. Shpilkes), My Penelope, some older tunes like Ranül, Open Movement #1 and  May Daze, and

a few standards like Epistrophy by Monk, The Clincher by David "Fathead" Newman, and Volunteered Slavery by Rahsaan Roland Kirk.

Come and hear the band ... you won't be disappointed.

 

Conversations CD Release

Joe Poole on drums and me on saxophones will be doing our official CD release of the NOW Orchestra Records release, Conversation.

We'll be playing on April 19th at the new 1067 space at 1115B East Hastings (entrance on Glen Drive).

Show is at 10 pm and the cover is only $5.

I hope you can come out. The CD is a really exciting one and one that you can pick up on the night.

Hee's a review:

Coat Cooke & Joe Poole. Conversations. NOW Orchestra Records CLNOW0006.

Vancouver saxophonist Coat Cooke has always been in full control of his horn and is capable of great heights of creativity. He leads the NOW Orchestra and is extremely active in many parts of the Canadian music community. But few projects have given him, as this one does, the freedom to express the full breadth of his artistry. Poole, one of Vancouer’s first-call drummers, here gives Cooke the solid yet sensitive foundation that allows him to soar. This is their first outing together, and it’s a fruitful one. The CD is full of listening, perhaps even more so than playing, and in the music world, that is a high compliment. The music on this CD possesses a rare clarity of expression such as comes only with years of paring music down to its essence. Although clearly free improv, the playing is not subject to the self-absorbed clichés that plague that genre. Instead, it bursts with life, creativity, and discovery. —Randy Raine-Reusch

 

High Wire/Conversations review by Stuart Broomer

Vancouver saxophonist Coat Cooke may be best known as the leader of the NOW Orchestra, a brilliant aggregation of 16 Vancouver improvisers that set a national standard for such ensembles. He’s heard on a very different scale on two new releases, each featuring a duo. Cooke’s free-jazz side comes through on Conversations with drummer Joe Poole (Now Orchestra CLNOW006 www.noworchestra.com) with Cooke working through the saxophone family in a series of dialogues ranging from the intensity of Feeling Feint to the puckishly vocal Dancing the Night Away, all of it enhanced by Poole’s subtly complex drumming. There’s a very different side of Cooke to be heard on the free improvisation of High Wire with Montreal guitarist Rainer Wiens (Now Orchestra CLNOW007). The emphasis is on texture and timbre, eerie whistling saxophone tones moving through layers of bowed and scratched guitar strings. There’s something uncannily involving about these fragile, evolving drones, a kind of tensile strength and focus that rewards sustained attention.

http://www.thewholenote.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=20850:jazz-eh-december-2012&catid=51:jazzaimprovised&Itemid=178

Yet more reviews

http://thewholenote.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=51&Itemid=178&limitstart=7

Vancouver saxophonist Coat Cooke may be best known as the leader of the NOW Orchestra, a brilliant aggregation of 16 Vancouver improvisers that set a national standard for such ensembles. He’s heard on a very different scale on two new releases, each featuring a duo. Cooke’s free-jazz side comes through on Conversations with drummer Joe Poole (Now Orchestra CLNOW006 www.noworchestra.com) with Cooke working through the saxophone family in a series of dialogues ranging from the intensity of Feeling Feint to the puckishly vocal Dancing the Night Away, all of it enhanced by Poole’s subtly complex drumming. There’s a very different side of Cooke to be heard on the free improvisation of High Wire with Montreal guitarist Rainer Wiens (Now Orchestra CLNOW007). The emphasis is on texture and timbre, eerie whistling saxophone tones moving through layers of bowed and scratched guitar strings. There’s something uncannily involving about these fragile, evolving drones, a kind of tensile strength and focus that rewards sustained attention.

The Whole Note – Stuart Broomer

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